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Honda Model X (2001)

The Honda Model X concept vehicle, developed and designed by Honda’s R&D in the U.S., revealed a tough and versatile vehicle powered by the next-generation i-VTEC 4-cylinder. Mated to the engine was a rally-style 5-speed manual transmission. A portion of the roofline slid forward, and the rear window disappeared down into the tailgate. To help provide an “open architecture” style, the Model X was designed without a B Pillar and with center opening rear doors. Inside, the cabin floor was made of textured resin for easy clean up, and the back of the front seats slid across the seat cushion to provide a rear-facing seat when the vehicle was parked.