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Buick Century Cruiser (1969)

Buick’s Century Cruiser concept car was designed for cruising on automated highways in the distant future. The experimental vehicle offered hands free driving, swivel contour seats, a refrigerator and TV set. When the Century Cruiser entered the expressways, a punched card with programmed routes would take over, piloting the car to the correct destination by information transmitted from electronic highway centers. The car’s progress could be watch on a strip map projected on a radar-like screen built-into the front console. The prototype could be manually operated via pistol grips positioned in the armrests for steering and speed regulation. An entrance canopy slid forward and upward, permitting doors on each side to glide ahead and allow passengers to enter.